1 Year Bloggerversary 

one year of blogging highlights

This week SC’s Scoop turned one year old, which means I’ve completed a full year of blogging! Say what!?!

It’s amazing to me to think about what I have done in the past year and think about how life was when I began this blog. Blogging is something I thought about doing for years before I pulled the trigger. Now I look back and think, “Why didn’t I start sooner?”

At the same time, blogging has been much harder than I thought it would be. I have put more time and energy into it than I expected to, but at the same time all the effort I put into this blog is a direct reflection of how much I enjoy it. Before I begin to ramble (and bore you!), I want to share the most popular blog posts and my personal favorite blog posts since SC’s Scoop began.

Most Popular Posts
My Personal Favorite Posts

I’ve learned A LOT in this past year and recently shared some advice for new bloggers that may be helpful if you are thinking about starting one. My favorite things about blogging are building relationships with other bloggers and having ownership over a creative outlet that also acts as a filing system for memories.

The two biggest highlights for this past year have been my nomination for the Blogger Recognition Award and monetizing my blog. I did not originally create my blog to make money off of it, so creating an income stream has been eye-opening and exciting. It is amazing to think how my skills have improved with marketing, social media and search engine optimization as well.

I would love to know what you’ve enjoyed about my blog, and if you have any favorite posts. For my fellow bloggers, what did you learn in your first year? Did you have any special moments or big highlights? What is your favorite thing about blogging? I’d love to hear your thoughts.

Cheers & have a great weekend!

Sarah Camille

P.S. Stay tuned for a feature on the outfit I’m wearing in the top photo.  All the clothing details will be up on Monday.

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How to Be True to Yourself 

Hi friends!

I’ve been working on this post off and on for quite some time, so I’m excited to finally share this with you. The past few months have included a lot of change for me – job changes, moving, engagement, wedding planning, family obligations, etc., and I’d be lying if I said it’s been smooth sailing! Thoughout these months however, I’ve had an important lightbulb moment that I think might be helpful for some of you.

That realization in summary is that so many of us (including me!) spend way too much time focused on pleasing other people and being “the person” other people want us to be. We loose sight of our authentic selves and our goals and life plans end up intertwined in the expectations placed on us by others. But the fault lies not on those who place expectations on us that don’t align with our true identity. The fault lies on ourselves for accepting those expectations as our own.

Let’s Rewind

Throughout my childhood, I often heard from my mom four particular words. Be true to yourself. These words would come most often when I struggled to make a decision. I would tell my mom how torn I was, how I felt like I had to choose one friend over another or how I wasn’t sure how to move forward with something because I knew it was the right thing to do but that it would make someone else upset.

As a child, I was super concerned about upsetting other people — family, friends or teachers. But I also had a strong sense of self. I knew exactly when I didn’t believe in something. So in those moments, when I was torn between upholding my integrity and maintaining my relationships, my mom would always say those four words. It is something that has stuck with me, something I hear replay in my mind all the time.

Fast Forward to the Present

I reflected on this advice and had my lightbulb moment when I stumbled across a TedTalk, “The art of being yourself” by Caroline McHugh. McHugh talks about how easily we get wrapped up in what others think of us. It made me realize how often I am concerned with what other people are thinking and how other people are feeling, that I often lose sight of my own thoughts and feelings. My desire to please other people can be damaging when it means I am not maintaining my authenticity; when I am not remaining true to myself. Of course, there are times when our thoughts and feelings must take the back seat, like if a loved one is sick and wishes to be taken care of in a way that we would not have chosen.

But all too often we function on auto-pilot and put the thoughts and feelings of our friends and family at the forefront.  We let their vision of who we are dictate our lives, and we loose that clarity we once had as a child. When that happens we risk loosing touch of who we are. And as Caroline points out, we cannot be content with ourselves when we do not know what rings true in our hearts.

Almost in synchronicity, soon after I watched McHugh’s video, Will sent me an article, “Why We Love Ourselves But Care More About Other People’s Opinons.” It discusses how we place more importance on other people’s opinions than on our own opinions. We seek acceptance from others, and in many ways it’s natural to do so. But as I’ve mentioned, we loose contentment with ourselves when we don’t place enough importance on our own thoughts or we shy away from being true to ourselves.

So what?!

This revelation may seem irrelevant to some of you. It may seem like a no-brained. I may also sound like a crazy person. But the important thing isn’t my lightbulb moment. It’s figuring out where I go from here, and how to stay in touch with my authentic self.

I’ve realized just how much I overthink what I’m doing. I wonder what people will think. I question whether or not people truly understand me. I question whether or not I unintentionally offended someone. And I’ve realized how much extra stress that puts in my life and how much time it takes out of my day to day life.

My goal now is to recognize those moments when I am overthinking things and redirect my thoughts into a positive direction. I reaffirm my authenticity, but reflecting on the things that align with my true nature and letting go of the things that are not me.

It’s unfortunate we live in a society where individuality and differences aren’t celebrated more; where so many people copy each other and accept someone else’s identity as their own. We should aim to be more accepting of different people’s thoughts and not expect everyone (including close family and friends) to live or think the same way we do.

Authenticity is a quality of high importance to me. I look for it in the people I surround myself with. I know this post may seem idealistic, but I hope some of you can relate.

Cheers to YOU!

Sarah Camille

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Motorcycle Racing: Up, Close & Personal

Motorcycle Racing: Up Close & Personal

Will told me of his passion for motorcycle racing the day I met him. With what I now know as his “serious face,” he shared how he got into motorcycles and what he loved about racing. I sensed some hesitation when he told me about it. I think he was unsure what I would think. In the moment, I didn’t understand what this passion really meant or what it entailed, but I loved seeing this guy I had just met was so dedicated and passionate about a sport that was so very different from his 9 to 5 job.

Fast forward to last weekend. I finally went with Will to a motorsports park to cheer for him and his teammate as they competed in a 4 hour endurance race. While I’ve heard a lot about motorcycle racing and everything that encompasses it in the past couple years (thanks to Will!), I was excited to see all the action in person.

For those of you scratching your head, thinking, “um.. what is she talking about?” I’ll give you an overview of what this motorcycle racing thing entails. The people who race in these events usually buy parts to build their bike just how they like it. Then from April to October racing events are hosted at motorsports parks around the country which you can enter. There are different classes for the races based on the type of bike you have and how heavy it is. First, second and third place also get prize money (whoop whoop!).

The Similarities…

It is quite similar to Nascar, except the motorsports tracks are not a true circle (though I have been known to poke fun at Will for riding around in a “circle” all day :-D!). There are various levels of competitiveness. Some people do it purely for fun and stick to tracks near their home, while others have multiple sponsorships and travel tens of thousands of miles to go to several races each year.

To me, motorcyle racing is a lot like the day long swim events or the regattas I attended when I competitively rowed crew in high school. There is a similar, lengthy time commitment and travel involved that is usually not an element of other sports. Last weekend at the motorsports park, I remembered just how long my regattas were (6am-6pm easily) and traveling to other states to race. There’s also a similar “camping out that takes place” in between your races.

What Surprised Me…

There is a sense of comraderie I felt soon after I arrived at the motorsports park. It kind of felt like you were instantly in a club the minute you passed through the gate. Everyone was so friendly and willing to help out others, even if they could be considered competition. There was also a lot of humor and a lightheartedness that made me feel at ease despite a constant hubub of activity going on around us during the day.

The other surprising factor at the race track was how little people’s lives outside the track were discussed. People could tell you what bike so-and-so raced, how long he’s been racing but not what that person did for a living. Especially coming from the D.C. area, where the first question someone asks you is, “What do you do?” it was refreshing to escape that career-focused mentality and have fun.

Since going to the motorsports park and seeing Will in action, I’m even more impressed by his dedication with this sport. He and his teammate got 3rd place after the bike stalled and Will had to push it back to the starting line (I’m pretty sure I would have just called it a day after that ordeal!).

I also have a better understanding of his love for it. I’m pretty much the opposite in terms of my “need for speed.” I get nervous when I’m going “too fast” on water skis and I’m quite comfortable snowboarding on the novice slopes, averaging about 5mph! While I don’t have the desire to do what Will does and I do worry about his safety when he races, I loved seeing him doing something he loves and being able to give him my support in person.

Do you have a loved one who plays a sport you initially knew nothing about? I’d love to hear your thoughts and your impression of motorcycle racing. Let me know if you have any questions, too.

Cheers!

Sarah Camille

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